Welcome!

Adobe Flex Authors: Matthew Lobas, PR.com Newswire, Shelly Palmer, Kevin Benedict

Related Topics: Adobe Flex

Adobe Flex: Article

Cover Story: How to Increase the Frame Rates of Your Flash Movies

How's Your Need For Speed?

Flash in its essence began as a tool for creating vector animations on the web. The Flash Player was designed specifically as a lightweight animation viewer to display those moving vector objects which are in their simplest form, mathematical equations that describe complex shapes made up of points, lines, curves and fills. However, nowadays developers and designers are using Flash to do a lot more than just animation, today we see Flash being used for everything from interactive banner ads to games and large applications with complex user interfaces. We are now pushing Flash to its limits and our frame rates are starting to suffer as we continue to develop content that is more application centric.

The Flash Player has had obvious performance limitations for some time now:; the vector renderer inside the player generally coughs and splutters when it attempts to play Flash Movies that contain large amounts of objects on the stage. This is because the player is not optimized to deal with large amounts of static content, by design, each frame all the vector objects on the stage have to be updated and redrawn regardless of whether they have changed, which is an intensive and unnecessary process.

In this release of the Flash Player, Macromedia have addressed these visual performance issues by making various improvements and optimizations to the renderer and adding various new features which developers can use to take advantage of these significant changes.

This article will show you how to effectively utilize these new performance related features to increase the frame rates of your Flash Movies.

Bitmap Caching
One of the most significant additions to the player in this release has to be the new Bitmap Caching capabilities. This feature gives developers that are experiencing poor frame rates the power to greatly increase the speed at which large amounts of objects are updated and drawn onto the stage by the renderer.

The renderer is a very important part of the Flash Player; it is responsible for everything that you see when you view a Flash Movie. It draws all the vector and bitmap data onto the stage. Every frame, the renderer has to update the stage and the various objects it contains to reflect any changes since the last frame using ActionScript and/or animation. This process can become quite intensive when a large amount of updating has to be done on any given frame. Using this feature gives the developer some control over the amount of work that the renderer has to perform each frame. The less work you give the renderer, the faster and smoother your Flash Movie will run.

So How Does It Work?
When you turn on Bitmap Caching for any given movie clip, the player converts the contents of the movie clip into a bitmap which it generates and then stores in memory alongside the original vector data equivalent. The renderer then displays this bitmap in place of the vector data by copying the image from memory onto the stage. This process essentially makes the renderer's life easier, because it doesn't have to update the movie clip each frame, instead it only has to draw the bitmap it generated once and from then on it simply copies the bitmap from memory onto the stage, unless of course you change the movie clip or its contents, which will regenerate the bitmap. There will be little or no visual difference when a movie clip has bitmap caching turned on. You may notice a very slight difference because the vector data is snapped to the nearest whole pixel when the bitmap is generated. Bitmap Caching also works perfectly well with nested movie clips (movie clips inside movie clips). To put it in simple terms, by turning on Bitmap Caching for a movie clip, you are essentially telling the Flash Player: "Hey Renderer, I'll make your life a little easier. Freeze this movie clip and display it as a bitmap instead because this movie clip or its contents are not going to change very often, if at all. They are static."

Turning Bitmap Caching On and Off
Bitmap Caching comes in the form of an additional movie clip property that can be switched on or off at both Authortime using the Property Inspector and at runtime using ActionScript, on a per movie clip basis.

Using the Authoring Environment
You can turn Bitmap Caching on or off for any movie clip in the authoring environment using the Property Inspector. Bitmap Caching is disabled for all movie clips by default.

To turn Bitmap Caching on select the desired movie clip instance on the stage by clicking on it. Then open the Property Inspector from the Window menu. (Window > Properties > Properties) or use the Keyboard Shortcut CTRL + F3

In the bottom right hand corner of the Properties Inspector under the Blend field, you will see an option called Use Runtime Bitmap Caching. Click this checkbox to turn Bitmap Caching on for the selected movie clip. Bitmap Caching is turned off by default for all movie clips.

Using ActionScript
Bitmap Caching can also be turned on and off at runtime using actionscript. Every movie clip object now has a new actionscript property called cacheAsBitmap. To turn Bitmap Caching ON for a movie clip with actionscript you simply need to set the value of its cacheAsBitmap property to true like so: someMovieClip.cacheAsBitmap=true; //Turn Bitmap Caching ON Similarly, to turn Bitmap Caching OFF for a movie clip using actionscript you simple need to set the value of its cacheAsBitmap property to false as follows: someMovieClip.cacheAsBitmap=false; //Turn Bitmap Caching OFF You can also determine if a movie clip has Bitmap Caching turned on, by retrieving the value of the cacheAsBitmap property: isCached=someMovieClip.cacheAsBitmap;

When Should I Use Bitmap Caching?
If used correctly, Bitmap Caching can dramatically reduce the amount of updating instructions that the renderer has to process every frame and thus your movies should in practice run a lot quicker and smoother. However in certain circumstances Bitmap Caching could have a detrimental effect on the performance of your flash movie, therefore you should choose the movie clips that you cache wisely.

Bitmap Caching works best for movie clips whose visual appearance doesn't change often or at all. That is because when a cached movie clip or its contents change, the area or region of vector data that changed is regenerated and then updated into the bitmap that is held in memory and the renderer displays the new bitmap. Bitmap Caching also works well for movie clips that contain complex vector data (i.e. shapes with lots of curves or gradient fills) as it is quicker for the renderer to copy a bitmap from memory onto the stage than draw all those vectors to the stage.

Every time you rotate, scale or change the alpha of a cached movie clip, the whole bitmap has to be regenerated. So, turning on bitmap caching for a movie clip that is constantly rotating, changing in size or contains an animation doesn't make much sense because every frame the renderer has to update the bitmap to reflect the new appearance of the movie clip aswell as redraw it to the stage, which is added overhead.

The whole idea of this feature is to reduce the amount of updates that the renderer has to perform each frame, turning it on in such situations doesn't reduce the number of updates that the renderer has to perform. On the other hand it would be very beneficial for you to turn on Bitmap Caching for all movie clips that are either static or move around, but don't change visually. It is perfectly fine to move a cached movie clip around the stage, either with ActionScript or with timeline animation because moving it around won't change its visual appearance and therefore the cached bitmap doesn't have to be updated; the renderer will merely draw the bitmap at its new position.

Valid Usecase Scenario
Consider the following scenario: You have a large application that contains multiple Window components; each Window component contains numerous other Components. Each Window component is draggable. When the user drags one of the Windows around the application, he notices a slow down and the Window has to catch up to the mouse position, which causes jerky movement.

To fix this problem, the developer turns on Bitmap Caching for each Window component instance. Now the player only has to update the internal bitmap representation of each Window component when the visual appearance of one of the UI Components inside it changes. The rest of the time, including when the Window component is being dragged around, it simply needs to move the bitmaps around the stage, as opposed to constantly updating the stage from the vector data in each movie clip. The result is a much smoother dragging experience for the user.

More Stories By Guy Watson

Guy Watson (aka FlashGuru) has been a well-recognized figure in the Flash community for around four years, supporting the community with tutorials and source files, moderating the large Flash community forums, and running his own Flash resource Web site - FlashGuru's MX 101. Guy was one of the two developers that created the award-winning zoom interface for Relevare and now works for Endemol UK, the creative force behind reality television, producing programs such as Big Brother and The Salon. Guy now spends most of his time developing Flash games and applications for high-profile clients such as Channel 5 Television, Ladbrookes, and UK Style.

Comments (24)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


IoT & Smart Cities Stories
In an age of borderless networks, security for the cloud and security for the corporate network can no longer be separated. Security teams are now presented with the challenge of monitoring and controlling access to these cloud environments, at the same time that developers quickly spin up new cloud instances and executives push forwards new initiatives. The vulnerabilities created by migration to the cloud, such as misconfigurations and compromised credentials, require that security teams t...
AI and machine learning disruption for Enterprises started happening in the areas such as IT operations management (ITOPs) and Cloud management and SaaS apps. In 2019 CIOs will see disruptive solutions for Cloud & Devops, AI/ML driven IT Ops and Cloud Ops. Customers want AI-driven multi-cloud operations for monitoring, detection, prevention of disruptions. Disruptions cause revenue loss, unhappy users, impacts brand reputation etc.
Today's workforce is trading their cubicles and corporate desktops in favor of an any-location, any-device work style. And as digital natives make up more and more of the modern workforce, the appetite for user-friendly, cloud-based services grows. The center of work is shifting to the user and to the cloud. But managing a proliferation of SaaS, web, and mobile apps running on any number of clouds and devices is unwieldy and increases security risks. Steve Wilson, Citrix Vice President of Cloud,...
As the fourth industrial revolution continues to march forward, key questions remain related to the protection of software, cloud, AI, and automation intellectual property. Recent developments in Supreme Court and lower court case law will be reviewed to explain the intricacies of what inventions are eligible for patent protection, how copyright law may be used to protect application programming interfaces (APIs), and the extent to which trademark and trade secret law may have expanded relev...
Cloud computing, big data and AI provide a new impetus and urgency to traditional enterprises to become digitally transformed businesses as they face disruption from new players who leverage technology to foster new business models. Traditionally, enterprises focused on digitizing processes and transactions. The incumbents can also be disruptors by leveraging AI for data-driven insights and innovate at scale on Cloud platform. They need to uncover the power of ERP/SAP using Cloud, AI and Big dat...
When Enterprises started adopting Hadoop-based Big Data environments over the last ten years, they were mainly on-premise deployments. Organizations would spin up and manage large Hadoop clusters, where they would funnel exabytes or petabytes of unstructured data.However, over the last few years the economics of maintaining this enormous infrastructure compared with the elastic scalability of viable cloud options has changed this equation. The growth of cloud storage, cloud-managed big data e...
Your applications have evolved, your computing needs are changing, and your servers have become more and more dense. But your data center hasn't changed so you can't get the benefits of cheaper, better, smaller, faster... until now. Colovore is Silicon Valley's premier provider of high-density colocation solutions that are a perfect fit for companies operating modern, high-performance hardware. No other Bay Area colo provider can match our density, operating efficiency, and ease of scalability.
The Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) is a non-profit organization that provides business support services to companies expanding to Japan. With the support of JETRO's dedicated staff, clients can incorporate their business; receive visa, immigration, and HR support; find dedicated office space; identify local government subsidies; get tailored market studies; and more.
The graph represents a network of 1,329 Twitter users whose recent tweets contained "#DevOps", or who were replied to or mentioned in those tweets, taken from a data set limited to a maximum of 18,000 tweets. The network was obtained from Twitter on Thursday, 10 January 2019 at 23:50 UTC. The tweets in the network were tweeted over the 7-hour, 6-minute period from Thursday, 10 January 2019 at 16:29 UTC to Thursday, 10 January 2019 at 23:36 UTC. Additional tweets that were mentioned in this...
Artificial intelligence, machine learning, neural networks. We're in the midst of a wave of excitement around AI such as hasn't been seen for a few decades. But those previous periods of inflated expectations led to troughs of disappointment. This time is (mostly) different. Applications of AI such as predictive analytics are already decreasing costs and improving reliability of industrial machinery. Pattern recognition can equal or exceed the ability of human experts in some domains. It's devel...